Yes, Keep Flossing!

Aristo Shyn DMD says FlossAmerican Dental Society has recommended brush two times a day, floss daily and see your dentist every six months for YEARS. This good dental hygiene routine keeps our patients healthy. But, lately when we ask, “Do you floss regularly?” some patients have responded,  “Do I need to floss?”   Emphatically…”Yes!”

Regardless of the latest study, evidence-based dentistry shows that flossing works.

Flossing removes food, plaque, and bacteria between teeth. It is important that you continue flossing because the bristles of your tooth brush don’t get between your teeth. We see a number of patients with cavities between teeth because of this debris and bacteria. Flossing is the only way to clean between your teeth outside of a dental office.

Flossing also prevents gum disease (gingivitis) and bone loss (periodontitis). Periodontal disease has been shown to increase the risk of heart disease. Flossing reduces these risks.

Flossing remains an integral part of the healthy dental hygiene routine; brush and floss to protect your overall health.

“Do I need to floss?”

“Yes!”

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Dental Erosion

brushing teethCavities aren’t the only thing that can hurt your teeth. A growing number of people these days suffer from dental erosion. Dental erosion is often caused by the acid in the food we eat and the beverages we drink. It has a chemical reaction that essentially softens the enamel, which is the protective layer over the teeth and over time, the enamel can erode. It can also lead to both tooth and gum problems.

Luckily, there are ways to prevent this from happening. Don’t brush your teeth right after eating or drinking something that would be acidic. If you drink a soda or have foods such as oranges, lemons or grapefruit, or even sour candies – rinse your mouth out with some water. Wait at least 30 minutes before brushing. Your enamel is going to be soft for a little while and you want to wait until it gets harder again before you brush.

Lastly, use a soft toothbrush and don’t overbrush. Also, stay away from overly-abrasive toothpaste.

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Sensitive Teeth

brushing teeth - pixabayThere are many different causes of Teeth Sensitivity.

Don’t suffer needlessly, give us a call today and end the pain of sensitivity.

In the meantime, here are some things you should avoid:

• Foods and beverages that are higher in acid, such as soda, and citrus fruits and drinks.
• Wine and yogurt, which may also be acidic.
• Brushing and flossing teeth too vigorously.
• Bleaching your teeth.
• Using an abrasive toothpaste.

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Biting Off More than You Can Chew

chewingIn our fast-paced lives, many of us may be eating in a hurry, taking giant bites of our food to get done quickly and on to the next task.

Taking bites that are too big to chew can be bad for your jaw and teeth. As is biting into hard candies which can chip teeth. Even apples can cause problems.

If you need to open your mouth more than feels comfortable to take a bite, cut it into smaller portions that are easy to chew.

Also, avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and opening nuts with your teeth, which can lead to chipping and breakage of natural teeth and restorations.

And never use your teeth as a tool!

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