What You Should Know About Teeth Whitening

Tooth discoloration is natural
For each and every person, teeth yellowing is a normal part of life. It simply comes with the process of aging. The inner part of the tooth, called dentin, can become discolored due to a significant events such as certain diseases, medications or injuries. The yellowing of dentin is usually due to unfortunate circumstances and not the actions of the person. The outer part of the tooth, called enamel, can also turn yellow. However, this is due to the habits or choices of the person, or just everyday life. Actions such as grinding your teeth, smoking tobacco or taking in acids from foods and drinks that you eat can thin enamel earlier, making teeth become yellow sooner.

Two types of whitening strategies
“Intrinsic” whitening refers to targeting the inner part of the tooth. The dentin soaks up whitening agent and becomes lighter. When the inner part of the tooth becomes whiter, that is reflected through the enamel. Intrinsic whitening treatments can include laser whitening, resin bonding, veneer treatment.

“Extrinsic” whitening is the removal of stains on the outer part of the tooth, the enamel. This is a much easier process and can be done at home or in-office. Techniques for extrinsic whitening can come in the several forms including trays, strips and toothpastes.

What to know before you begin
Teeth Need to be Healthy – Refrain from whitening your teeth is you already have a dental condition such as gum disease, exposed roots, cavities, crooked teeth, or gum recession. Exacerbating these problems can easily lead to further issues.

Tooth Sensitivity Can Occur – One common side effect of teeth whitening is brief sensitivity after your teeth have been exposed to whitening gel. This is normal but should still be taken into consideration. Use of a pain reliever is acceptable when sensitivity is particularly high.

It Won’t Last Forever – Tooth whitening does not last for forever. That’s the unfortunate truth. Regardless of treatments, teeth naturally yellow overtime with age, diet and lifestyle. Most results from a round of whitening last from 6 months up to 2 years, depending on the individual. Then it will be time for another round.

More is More – Exercise caution as you strive for whiter teeth. Too much whitening in too short of a time period will cause permanent damage to teeth. Whitening too frequently can cause teeth to look translucent or discolored, of which the only fix is completely replacing the affected teeth. Whitening is safe when done correctly.

When you should NOT whiten
● Your teeth are already very sensitive
● You have gum recession or sensitivity
● You have sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide
● You have cavities
● You are pregnant or breastfeeding
● You’re under age 18
● You have visible plastic fillings or crowns

The takeaway

Teeth whitening, whether in-office or at home, is a relatively safe and low-risk cosmetic dental treatment when performed on healthy teeth. It can be used to treat the yellowing of enamel due to aging, smoking or certain drinks. Remember to keep the treatments few and far between to ensure the health of your teeth. For remedies concerning the darkening of inner-tooth dentin, schedule an appointment with us to discuss.

Continue Reading

“Why Do I Need A Crown?”

dental crown Norcross Dentist Aristo Shyn

You found out that you may be needing a dental crown. You are not alone! Many (if not most) people in America have at least one crown.

What is that exactly? A dental crown is a tooth-shaped cap that covers a tooth to restore the shape, size, stability, and appearance. It is a secure, long-term way to enhance the look and structure of your smile.

So, why do we use these?

Here are some situations in which you may need a dental crown:
• Restore a tooth that is broken or worn down
• Protect a tooth that is weak (decay, erosion…)
• Support a dental bridge
• Cover a dental implant
• Protect a root canal
• Cosmetic enhancement (cover tooth that is misshapen or discolored)

When you do need a crown, here are the steps that we will take you through:
• Preparing the tooth for the crown by removing the outer portion and any decay that may be present.
• Making an impression of the tooth to ensure a secure fit for the crown.
• Placing a temporary crown on the tooth while the permanent one is being made.
• Using the impression model to create your permanent crown.
• Cementing your crown in place and ensuring that fit is comfortable and the appearance is natural.

Crowns can be made out of a variety of materials: metal alloys, ceramics, porcelain, composite resin, or a combination. We will work to make sure that the crown not only matches the surrounding teeth but also feels comfortable in the mouth. On average, each crown will last anywhere from 5 to 15 years.

Lucky for you, a dental crown does not necessarily need special at-home treatment. Simply continue with your good oral hygiene practices – brushing, flossing and mouthwash daily – and make sure that the gums surrounding the crown are clean.

Just remember that crowns are not indestructible! Be mindful of what you put in your mouth and try to steer clear of hard food or objects.

Read more about Crowns and Bridges on our practice website http://www.aristoshyndmd.com/crowns-bridges/

As always, we are available to answer your questions. Just give us a call at (770) 448-1977, we are happy to help!

Be Well!

 

Continue Reading

Pregnancy’s Affect on Oral Health

Aristo Shyn DMD dental care while pregnantIt’s no surprise that pregnancy effects the entire body, and when you are expecting, your oral health changes, as well. Routine dental visits are safe during pregnancy, for most women, but it’s important to let your dentist know what stage of pregnancy you are in when you make your appointment. Also, be sure and let the staff know of any special advice you may have received from your doctor prior to the visit, or if there are any medication changes.

One of the few oral changes you may experience is dry mouth, which makes oral hygiene during pregnancy so important to maintain. Ways to do so include a typical routine of brushing for two full minutes twice a day, flossing daily and using an antimocrobial mouthwash. Drinking plenty of water may ease the discomfort, as it will help rinse away bacteria growing in the mouth normally cleared away by saliva.

Pregnancy gingivitis is another expectation. It’s generally due to the increase in progesterone that may enourage the growth of bacteria that causes gingivitis. Around the second month of pregnancy, it’s common for some women to notice symptoms of swollen gums and gums that are redder than normal and bleed more easily during brushing. These symptoms should subside after the baby is born so there is no need for concern. However, if there is pain or discomfort, you may need to come in for a checkup.

The last is enamel erosion, which is common for women who have vomiting due to morning sickness. Frequent vomiting can quickly lead to the erosion of teeth because of it’s high acid content which can leave the enamel of your teeth susceptible to damage. If you are experiencing morning sickness, remember not to brush immediately after vomiting, not even a gentle brushing. Instead, rinse your mouth with water, then brush 20-30 minutes later.

If you are pregnant and concerned about your oral health give us a call…….
We will make certain your oral health is on the right track and you can be sure you are at your healthiest when your little bundle of joy arrives.

Continue Reading

Yes, Keep Flossing!

Aristo Shyn DMD says FlossAmerican Dental Society has recommended brush two times a day, floss daily and see your dentist every six months for YEARS. This good dental hygiene routine keeps our patients healthy. But, lately when we ask, “Do you floss regularly?” some patients have responded,  “Do I need to floss?”   Emphatically…”Yes!”

Regardless of the latest study, evidence-based dentistry shows that flossing works.

Flossing removes food, plaque, and bacteria between teeth. It is important that you continue flossing because the bristles of your tooth brush don’t get between your teeth. We see a number of patients with cavities between teeth because of this debris and bacteria. Flossing is the only way to clean between your teeth outside of a dental office.

Flossing also prevents gum disease (gingivitis) and bone loss (periodontitis). Periodontal disease has been shown to increase the risk of heart disease. Flossing reduces these risks.

Flossing remains an integral part of the healthy dental hygiene routine; brush and floss to protect your overall health.

“Do I need to floss?”

“Yes!”

Continue Reading

Sensitive Teeth

brushing teeth - pixabayThere are many different causes of Teeth Sensitivity.

Don’t suffer needlessly, give us a call today and end the pain of sensitivity.

In the meantime, here are some things you should avoid:

• Foods and beverages that are higher in acid, such as soda, and citrus fruits and drinks.
• Wine and yogurt, which may also be acidic.
• Brushing and flossing teeth too vigorously.
• Bleaching your teeth.
• Using an abrasive toothpaste.

Continue Reading

Biting Off More than You Can Chew

chewingIn our fast-paced lives, many of us may be eating in a hurry, taking giant bites of our food to get done quickly and on to the next task.

Taking bites that are too big to chew can be bad for your jaw and teeth. As is biting into hard candies which can chip teeth. Even apples can cause problems.

If you need to open your mouth more than feels comfortable to take a bite, cut it into smaller portions that are easy to chew.

Also, avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and opening nuts with your teeth, which can lead to chipping and breakage of natural teeth and restorations.

And never use your teeth as a tool!

Continue Reading